Writing a figurative language poem

Distinguish shades of meaning among related words that describe states of mind or degrees of certainty e.

Writing a figurative language poem

Adding More Structure and Support I called my students to come and sit on the carpet in front of the Activboard. I said, "Today we are going to learn how to use everything we've learned about onomatopoeia, alliteration, similes, metaphors, and personification to make really interesting poems that show strong feelings to our readers.

While researching for this unit I found an amazing quote from author Vivian Gilbert Zabel. I read, "Poetry begs for emotion, in the wording by the poet and in the mind of the reader.

Yet many wonder how to create emotion in their writing. One way to enhance emotion is to use poetic devices. Then I said, "Let's look at some more examples so we can see how author's use figurative language in poems.

Then I went to slide 38 where it showed the 5 components of figurative language we have been working on. I said, "You are going to write a poem and you will need to use 3 out of 5 of these components in your poem.

I am going to write 2 poems now and model for you how to do this. I also discussed what feeling I wanted to convey to my reader before I even started to write. Then I modeled two poems for my students. After I had modeled my two poems I said, "Do you think you'll be able to do this now?

I passed out blank paper and bookmarks for the students to refer back to. I said, "Now remember, the important part of writing our poetry is to convey a feeling. Before you even start writing, think about how you want your reader to feel.

writing a figurative language poem

Refer back to your bookmark and think about which 3 out of the 5 components you want to put in your poem. They have really been enjoying this poetry unit, and today's lesson was no different.

The students wanted to show me their work as I was walking around videoing them. I could tell they felt empowered and confident because I heard them say things like, "I'm going to use a simile, onomatopoeia, and personification. You can catch my students in action by watching this: We went up to the carpet and I called on students one at a time.

We were all positive, and my students absolutely loved sharing. You can see my thoughts on their work by watching this: Student Work Figurative Language.Figurative language is an element of poetry that creates strong imagery through unexpected comparisons and word associations. As you read a poem, finding examples of metaphors, similes, personification and other devices can provide valuable clues to .

Figurative language is an element of poetry that creates strong imagery through unexpected comparisons and word associations.

As you read a poem, finding examples of metaphors, similes, personification and other devices can provide valuable clues to its themes.

Writing: Poetry & Figurative Language. STUDY. PLAY. Poetry. A type of literature in which ideas and feelings are expressed in compact, imaginative, and musical language.

Tragedy. A brief poem or other writing in praise of a deceased person. Haiku. Figurative language says one thing but means another. However, figurative language does not intend to deceive. There is an expectation that figurative language will be understood and correctly interpreted by the listener or reader.

Figurative Language Poem 3: from The Grave by Robert Blair – This poem gives readers a wry interpretation of life and death.

It uses simile, metaphor, personification, hyperbole, and the tone of the poem is an intriguing centerpiece of discussion. Spice Up Your Poetry With Figurative Language. Students learn to recognize techniques used by poets, including simile, metaphor, and personification. Discuss how the poem changes once the language is changed.

Evaluate students' writing when rewriting the poem in this lesson.

Figurative Language Poems with Questions | Ereading Worksheets